The Sun and Her Flowers - Rupi Kaur

The Sun and Her Flowers

By Rupi Kaur

  • Release Date: 2017-10-03
  • Genre: Poetry
5 Score: 5 (From 1,739 Ratings)

Description

Divided into five chapters and illustrated by kaur, the sun and her flowers is a journey of wilting, falling, rooting, rising, and blooming. A celebration of love in all its forms.

this is the recipe of life
said my mother
as she held me in her arms as i wept
think of those flowers you plant
in the garden each year
they will teach you
that people too
must wilt
fall
root
rise
in order to bloom

Reviews

  • Amazing

    4
    By noellakkk
    Great book some pages are a little PG-13 but it's still such an amazing book.
  • The Sun and Her Flowers

    5
    By BillyZ-TX
    As a man, it gave me such insight. My appreciation has been magnified. Thank you.
  • 🌸🌸🌸

    5
    By amandax345
    Amazing she has done it again!!
  • Stunning

    5
    By DarkestRuby
    This book gave me the strength to change, to fully embrace myself as the woman I am, and so I should define my worth by myself instead of people’s view of me. Absolutely worth reading ❤️
  • Kinda weird. Wasn’t the kind of poetry I’m looking for. But wasn’t a waste of time either.

    3
    By CGLcrazy1
    I’ll finish and try to keep an open mind! Okay read,
  • DEFINITELY A REREAD

    5
    By PiZzAA StEve
    LOVED IT !!!!
  • wasn’t very intriguing pt 2

    1
    By Papa1342
    i bought this book and her previous book because a lot of people recommended it to me (friends, mutuals, people online) and honestly, it’s very unsatisfactory. most of the poems aren’t really poetry. it’s sad that many people consider their writings to be poetry just because you can call anything poetry now. the definition of poetry is, “literary work in which special intensity is given to the expression of feelings and ideas by the use of distinctive style and rhythm; poems collectively or as a genre of literature.” the problem with this is that a lot of her ‘poems’ are too simple. they’re something like a sentence you could say to a friend, but divided into different stanzas. most of the poems don’t show any literary expertise. there aren’t many metaphors or figurative language, no rhyming, or distinctive/individual style...
  • i love Rupi Kaur💙

    5
    By asiamonaa
    i love Rupi Kaur 💙
  • Emotional

    5
    By mexsand
    The kind of book that you can read feel the pain love and all the emotion of the writer makes you think of your own life and your experiences and what life is really about
  • The Sun and Her Flowers

    5
    By Ashten Reeves
    I first discovered this book from a post someone had made on some social media platform. The post was an image of one of the pages in this exquisite piece of literature. I’d like to pick my favorite poem from this collection, and say it was the one that drew my attention, but I simply can’t choose just one. I highlighted every poem that stood out to me until I realized I was highlighting almost all of them. I can’t even remember which one stood out to me most, because every poem in this book is so wonderfully written. Rupi Kaur illustrates her life and experiences so vividly. You can feel her emotion in every syllable. It took me quite a while to finish reading this piece. At first, I quickly read through the pages, as I was yearning for more: I couldn’t put it down. It’s not the type of book that makes you think “I need to know what happens next”; it’s the type of book that makes you want to know what she feels next, how she grows from these tragedies, not only the experiences themselves, but how she illustrates her emotions and actions she so carefully expresses. When I realized I was nearing the last 50 or so pages, I put it down. I didn’t want it to end: I wanted to hold onto the feeling of this experience remaining ongoing. I have, however, finally finished it, after having been reminded that I can always read it again. I’ve rarely found a collection of poems that I love so much. Not many poets keep my attention throughout their poetry books. 10/10 would recommend this piece to anyone who even remotely enjoys reading poetry.

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